Volume 29, Issue 2 (11-2016)                   jdm 2016, 29(2): 109-115 | Back to browse issues page


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Rafatjou R, Razavi Z, Khalili M, Farhadian M. Oral health status in 5-18 years old children and adolescent with type 1 diabetes compared with healthy group in Hamadan, Iran 2013-2014. jdm. 2016; 29 (2) :109-115
URL: http://jdm.tums.ac.ir/article-1-5528-en.html

1- Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan
2- Associated Professor, Department of Pediatrics Department, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran Associated Professor, Department of Pediatrics Department, School of Medicine, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan
3- Dentist Dentist
4- Assistant Professor, Department Of Biostatistics, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran; Assistant Professor, Department Of Biostatistics, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan
Abstract:   (2510 Views)

Background and Aims: Type 1 diabetes mellitus, is the most common metabolic disorders in children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to assess the state of oral health in children with type 1 diabetes compared with healthy children in 2013-2014 in Hamadan province, Iran.

Materials and Methods: The specimens were selected through convenience sampling in two groups. Group one consisted of 80 individuals (5-18 years old; case group), suffering from type 1 diabetes mellitus referred to the Pediatric endocrine clinic. Control group consisted of 80 non-diabetic healthy children who were out- patients of pediatric and orthodontic department of Hamadan dental school. Two groups were similar in age and sex. The data were collected through a questionnaire, medical records and clinical examination. DMFT, dmft, GI and PI indices were assessed in each patient. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and T-test.

Results: In spite of similarity in oral hygiene habits in both group, there was no significant difference in mean DMFT and permanent decayed teeth in both groups (P>0.05), but the mean dmft (P<0.008) and primary decayed teeth (P<0.011) in the control group was significantly higher than that of the case group. Also, diabetic patients had significantly more gingival inflammation (P<0.05). The mean PI in the two groups did not differ significantly. Oral hygiene habits were similar in both groups but diabetic patients were significantly referred to dentists with lower frequency then that of control group (P=0.00).

Conclusion: The devastating effects of diabetes on the oral health, along with other side effects can be effective in promoting tooth decay and gingivitis in diabetic patients. Unfortunately, oral health care and programmed dental visit were not the priority for the diabetic patient (and parents) involved in our study. Therefore, programs to increase awareness and encourage patients for a better control of their oral health in order to diminish diabetes' devastating effects is recommended.

Full-Text [PDF 229 kb]   (861 Downloads)    
Type of Study: Research | Subject: general
Received: 2016/11/7 | Accepted: 2016/11/7 | Published: 2016/11/7

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